Riff It…Riff It Good!

Being vegetable farmers, we love all things vegetable; but no one pushes that envelope better than Yotam Ottolenghi. This man fascinates me with his amazing combinations. I love his cookbooks. They are a treasure trove of ideas and visual art. He encourages all of us to jump head first into the unusual. He is my mentor for true creativity in the kitchen. In his new cookbook Flavor, he introduces his philosophy of layering ingredients for optimal impact. He prefers plates and platters to bowls, and I have largely adopted that approach. By layering textures and flavors every ingredient has a chance to stand out on its own. He prepares condiments ahead of time, as flavor bombs. The simplest roasted vegetable takes on new life when topped with a sauce, relish or spice. The visual impact of food is also important, as we eat with our eyes; so color contrast takes on a whole new meaning. From the platter, to the color and texture of each layer, to the final garnishes, every element is crucial to the presentation of the dish.

In the spirit of trying a little used vegetable, we tried his celeriac steaks with Café De Paris sauce. This dish from Ottolenghi’s Flavor cookbook was so unusual, it was a literal treat for the tastebuds. After roasting the celeriac steaks, they were placed on top of a sauce of butter, shallot, garlic, anchovy, mustard and curry powder, capers, chives, tarragon and parsley. There are really no words to adequately describe this dish. Talk about a flavor bomb! Dishes like these can really get you thinking outside the box. So when I contemplated what vegetables we had on hand, and how I could use them creatively; I came up with the following recipe. You can make “steaks” out of many root vegetables, and we had an abundance of large turnips still in the ground. So I made turnip steaks. Then I needed another vegetable that would offer a color contrast to the turnip. I decided on carrots that I roasted and pureed with a little maple syrup and olive oil. I added a small amount of water; just enough to loosen it in my food processor without changing the flavor. The final decision was a dressing or sauce. I settled on a mustard vinaigrette, as both turnips and carrots would be enhanced by this addition. I garnished with chopped parsley and toasted breadcrumbs; but in hindsight thought a sprinkle of dukkah would have also worked well.

TURNIP STEAKS WITH CARROT PUREE & MUSTARD VINAIGRETTE

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3-4 large turnips (3 slices per person), peeled and sliced 1/2 inch thick
  • 6 large carrots, peeled and sliced in 2-inch chunks
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons grainy Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic or white wine vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large shallot, minced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, minced
  • 2 tablespoon toasted fresh breadcrumbs, or dukkah

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Prepare two large sheet pans, one for the carrots, and one for the turnip steaks by lining them with parchment paper.
  2. Scatter the carrots on one sheet pan and drizzle them with 1 tablespoon olive oil; toss with your hands. Sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Roast in oven for 30-40 minutes, turning carrots halfway through, until lightly browned and soft when tested with a knife. Let cool for 15 minutes.
  3. Place turnip steaks on sheet pan, leaving 1-inch between each slice. Baste both sides with olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for about 30-40 minutes, turning each slice over halfway through. They should look brown around the edges.
  4. In a food processor, place roasted carrots, 2 tablespoons olive oil and 1 tablespoon maple syrup; pulse 3 or 4 times. You want to leave some texture; if too thick add water 1 tablespoon at a time until you reach desired consistency. Place in bowl.
  5. Make vinaigrette, by combining both mustards, white balsamic vinegar, minced shallot, and 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil in a pint jar. Shake vigorously until combined.
  6. On a platter, place turnip steaks overlapping down the center. Spoon pureed carrots around the edge of platter. Drizzle dressing down the center of the turnips. Garnish with chopped parsley and breadcrumbs or dukkah.

Serves 4

“Winter is a season of recovery and preparation.” — Paul Theroux

Beyond Lettuce

When we elect to stay home as much as possible and self-shelter during this pandemic, how we have prepared can really make a difference. I really notice this during the winter as well. When it comes to salads, we need to think outside the box and get creative. For example, when Val and I were walking the dogs the other day on our farm, we came across a row of overgrown arugula. Rather than going to flower, it was still sending up small new leaves. They weren’t as tender as during the summer months, but they were still quite viable; more like field spinach. We picked about 12 cups of the stuff, and it’s working rather well in all sorts of dishes. Add this to dry cooked or canned beans and shredded carrots and you’ve got yourself a delicious healthy salad. No arugula, try spinach or kale. Both chickpeas and cannellini beans work, and most of us have olives, lemon juice and olive oil.

Having sturdy root vegetables on hand is also another way to get some ‘fresh’ in during winter. I go to the store about every 6 weeks, and when it comes to fresh vegetables it is as follows: potatoes, beets, peppers, carrots, cabbage, oranges and cherry tomatoes. Root vegetables are excellent, and the peppers and cherry tomatoes are throw in all sorts of recipes until their gone. I never buy lettuce in the winter! Most times it has been traumatized during transit and goes south in a matter of days. This is the seasonal time for citrus, so that can be a welcome addition.

BEAN SALAD WITH CARROTS, ARUGULA AND OLIVES

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 (15-ounce) cans of chickpeas or cannellini beans, rinsed
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • Pinch of cayenne
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 3 carrots, peeled and shredded on large holes of box grater
  • 1 small red onion, vertically sliced
  • 2 cup arugula, chopped coarse
  • 1/2 cup pitted Kalamata olives, halved

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Place beans in a microwave safe bowl. Mix together your olive oil, lemon juice, cayenne, and salt and pepper. Heat beans on high for 2 minutes; then pour dressing over warm beans. This will allow them to absorb the dressing and make them more flavorful. Let sit for 20-30 minutes
  2. Add carrots, arugula and olives; toss to combine. Season with additional salt and pepper.

“Winter forms our character and brings out our best.” —Tim Allen

Scandinavian Dauphinoise

Every morning during coffee, Val asks me the same question, “What’s for dinner today?” We go over the fresh vegetables we still have in our larder. When we created our larder for self-sheltering this winter, we chose vegetables with a long shelf-life such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets, onions, carrots, cabbage, winter squash and celeriac or celery root. I try to combine fresh with anything that was ‘put up’ during our farm year. Some items are frozen, some canned, others dried, so you can find all sorts of creative ways to make dishes that are unique and delicious. Simple ingredients combined together can yield unexpected results.

Whenever I am looking for inspiration, I will flip through cookbooks, take a look at what we have on hand, and try to create something that often crosses different cultures. The term dauphinoise (do-fin-WAHZ) is French for scalloped potatoes. Smoked salmon is found throughout Scandinavia. I find that certain combinations repeat themselves regardless of where they originated. In this case, cream with potatoes, onion, and dill with smoked salmon. This gratin, rather than being a side dish for a protein, is totally appropriate as a complete meal. Although you can make this with either cold or hot cured smoked salmon, I like using the cold cured so I can layer it between the potatoes and celeriac. If you choose hot cured, you will have to crumble it. But no worries they both taste delicious. If you have never tried celeriac before, you are in for a treat. It blends beautifully with the other ingredients, with its mild taste of celery, along with providing a nice texture difference. The finished product was surprisingly rich, and flavorful.

SCANDINAVIAN DAUPHINOISE

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 lemon, juiced, mixed with 1/4 cup water
  • 1 medium celeriac, peeled and quartered vertically
  • 3 medium baking potatoes, peeled (I use Yukon Golds or Russets)
  • 2 x 125g packs of cold cured smoked salmon
  • 1/2 cup fresh dill, chopped
  • 1 onion, halved and finely sliced vertically
  • 2 cups heavy cream (1 pint)

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place the lemon juice and water in a large bowl. On a mandolin, slice each quarter of celeriac 1/4 inch thick. Place in bowl and toss with lemon water. This will prevent it from browning.
  2. Do the same with the potatoes; slicing them 1/4 inch thick horizontally, placing them in the lemon water as well. Toss. In a 9×9 square ceramic baking dish, place slices of potatoes overlapping across the bottom; then layer with slices of celeriac on top of potatoes. Place slices of smoked salmon over celeriac; then slices of onion, followed by dill. Spoon 1/2 cup of heavy cream over the layers, and sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Repeat. You should be able to have 3 layers, ending with a layer of potatoes, cream and dill.
  3. Cover the dish with foil and place on a tray. Bake for 45 minutes, then remove the foil and bake for another 30-40 minutes, until bubbling and the top is crispy and golden. Let rest for 10 minutes before serving. Don’t forget a glass of crisp white wine.

Serves 4-6

“Food, like a loving touch, or a glimpse of divine power, has the ability to comfort.” –Norman Kolpas

Edible Culture

As the wind throws our wind chimes against the house, and stirs up whitecaps on the lake; I sit beside our wood burner feeling quite cozy. I was thinking about our kitchen fest last holiday weekend; I absolutely love egg dishes and had made Shashuka on Sunday. The dish’s name means ‘all mixed up’ and in a sense it is. Its name dates back to the Ottoman Empire and is a favorite in the Middle East, Israel and North Africa. It’s hardy, affordable and delicious with warm spices of cumin and smoked paprika, along with tomatoes, sweet peppers, chickpeas, onion, garlic and of course eggs. There are several similar egg dishes in the world that have some of these ingredients along with their own cultural flair. I have always thought that any dish combining tomatoes and eggs is an automatic winner.

Shashuka has a comforting nature and healthy ingredients. There are many variations that allow for levels of spiciness, along with vegetables, herbs and meat. You can add ground lamb or sausage before sautéing the onion and pepper, and garnish it with feta; or you can make it more Tex-Mex by omitting the paprika and adding chili powder, black beans or corn, then finishing it with chopped fresh cilantro and a squeeze of lime juice. It’s just plain flexible, so let your imagination soar. These days, practically any dish in which eggs are cooked in a sauce may be called Shashuka. In my last cookbook I have a recipe for Green Shashuka, made with spinach, Swiss chard, arugula or kale; along with onions, garlic, herbs, cream and feta.

SHASHUKA

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 sweet peppers, I like one red and one yellow, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 15-oz cans fire roasted tomatoes (or 6-8 fresh Roma tomatoes, chopped)
  • 1 15-oz can rinsed chickpeas
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons smoked paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon Aleppo pepper flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 2 cups packed baby spinach
  • 2 fresh eggs per person
  • 1/2 cup fresh micro-greens, chopped fresh parsley or cilantro for garnish
Let’s start with onions and garlic
Then add beautiful peppers and tomatoes

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. In a large non-stick or cast iron skillet, heat your oil over medium-high heat. Add onions and sauté for 3-4 minutes or until soft and translucent; add garlic and sauté 1 minute more. Add peppers and fresh tomatoes if using; cook until soft, about 8-10 minutes.
  2. Add fire-roasted tomatoes if using, then cumin, smoked paprika, Aleppo pepper (or red pepper flakes), black pepper, chickpeas and tomato paste. Stir to combine. Simmer until thickened, about 5-8 more minutes.
  3. Stir in baby spinach and fold gently until spinach wilts. Make indentations in the sauce and gently crack the eggs into the wells. Season eggs with salt and pepper. Cover the skillet, and cook until the egg whites are just set, but yolks are still soft, about 7-10 minutes.
  4. Carry skillet to table and serve hot, sprinkled with garnish of your choice.

Serves: 2-6

Eggs poaching in sauce
Beautiful Shashuka ready to eat!!

“Food is love!!”

Basic Comfort

As we dive into our pantry’s and larder’s, there are few things more affordable than beans. I always have assorted cans on hand for dinners that come together quickly. But when it comes to a texture and flavor difference, I can’t recommend enough, using dried beans. My goodness, could anything be more pantry stable and down right cheap? As many of us are home more than usual due to the pandemic, this is the perfect time to simmer up a pot of these amazing nuggets.

There are four dried beans that I always have on hand, both for their versatility and flavor: cannellini, chickpeas, dark red kidneys, and black. You can create beautiful soups, stews, salads and braises. It is not difficult to cook dried beans; it’s really a matter of time. Although I own an Instant Pot, I prefer to cook beans on the stove. I find that electric pressure cookers give you a lack of control. The beans tend to split and rupture their skins when cooked in a pressure cooker. The beauty of controlling the simmer and cooking time is they will be just right for your application. The only thing you really need to plan is soaking them overnight.

A pot on cannellini’s ready for the stove.

Sometimes you will cook beans to add to your recipe; other times they are part of the recipe and are cooked with your meat. There are a few nuances that I suggest when cooking beans. The most important one is don’t salt your beans while they are cooking. Salt makes the skins tough and doesn’t allow the bean to become soft. Once your beans are cooked to the texture required for your recipe, then feel free to add salt. Beans require salt! I also like to add a few cloves of garlic and a bay leaf, but this is an option, not a requirement. There is such a thing as the pot liqueur or the bean cooking liquid. When I cooked beans for this stew, I dished up a cup of the beans, pot liqueur and topped it with homemade basil oil. I literally swooned!

The following stew is a great way to use cooked cannellini beans. You can use either bulk Italian sausage or link. If you use links, you will simply remove their casings before cooking. The spinach adds a nice texture and color. If you don’t have spinach, you can use Swiss chard or ribboned kale or leave it out completely. The stew will still taste great!!

ITALIAN STEW WITH CANNELLINI AND SAUSAGE

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 cups dried cannellini beans
  • 3 cloves garlic and 1 bay leaf (optional)
  • 4 ounces pancetta, finally cubed
  • 1 pound bulk/or 5 links, Italian sausage, casings removed
  • 1/2 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1/2 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced
  • 3 carrots, peeled and diced 1/4 inch
  • 2 cups (packed) fresh baby spinach
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

FOR THE BEANS:

  1. Soak your 2 cups of beans overnight. Cover them with about 4 inches of water.
  2. Drain your beans and place in a Dutch oven of enamel covered cast iron pot and cover with water about 2 inches. Add garlic and bay leaf if using. Bring to a boil, then turn heat down to a simmer. Cover and cook 45-90 minutes until soft. Once soft, add 1 teaspoon Kosher salt and simmer 15 minutes more. Drain and separate beans in half. You will puree one half to thicken stew.
Italian sausage and pancetta

FOR STEW:

  1. If using links, take the sausage meat out of its casings and crumble it into a large soup pot, along with the pancetta.
  2. Cook over medium-high heat for 10-15 minutes, until thoroughly cooked and slightly browned. Meanwhile, prep the other ingredients.
  3. Transfer the sausage and pancetta to a plate lined with paper towels, leaving 2 tablespoons of fat in the pot (spoon any excess out).
  4. Add the onion to the pot and sauté for 3-5 minutes or until soft and translucent. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute more.
  5. Add the beans, chicken broth, Italian seasoning, and rosemary. Stir thoroughly and dissolve any browned bits in the bottom of pot. Simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. With an immersion blender, (I use a quart Mason jar) puree the remaining half of cooked beans until smooth. Add them back to the pot, along with the sausage and pancetta. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
  7. Remove stew from heat and stir in the baby spinach. The spinach will wilt in about 2 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings. Serve hot.

Serves 4-6

Ready to serve
Savory Italian bean and sausage stew.

” A stew sustains you against the hungers of the world.”

Little Orbs of Joy

I often find that if I’m making something that freezes well, why not double or triple the recipe? I often do this with sauces, condiments, caramelized onions and especially this recipe , Lamb & Feta Meatballs. If I make a single recipe I get approximately 16-18 meatballs. Two weeks ago I quadrupled the recipe using 4 pounds of ground lamb and made 60 (enough for 5-6 meals)!!

These little orbs are versatile and full of flavor. Plate them with last weeks recipe for Roasted Sweet Pepper and Tomato Sauce, place them in a pita with tomato and tahini sauce, use them in spaghetti and meatballs, serve them with tzatziki sauce. You can serve them as an appetizer by stabbing them with bamboo skewers with a sauce on the side. You get the idea. They freeze beautifully, so with a little effort, you are ready for a quick delicious option at a moments notice. If you have a food saver you are golden, if not, place frozen meatballs in a quart freezer bag and remove as much air as possible.

LAMB AND FETA MEATBALLS

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 pound grass-fed ground lamb
  • 4 ounces feta, crumbled
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves
  • 3 garlic cloves, grated on micro-planer
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 cup fresh breadcrumbs, without crusts, pulsed in a food processor
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
Lamb meatballs ready to freeze
Frozen meatballs vacuumed sealed

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. If making a single batch, preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper (you will use two of these to freeze the meatballs prior to vacuum sealing them if doubling or tripling your recipe).
  2. In a large mixing bowl, place the ground lamb, feta, thyme leaves, garlic, breadcrumbs, ground cinnamon, olive oil, along with salt and pepper and mix thoroughly with your hands. Using a meatball scoop or your hands, shape into golf ball size balls. You should end up with about 18 meatballs, placing them uniformly on baking sheet about 1 1/2 inches apart.
  3. If freezing extra, place sheet in freezer overnight. Once frozen place 10-12 meatballs in a vacuum seal bag or freezer bag and seal. To defrost place bag in sink of cool water for about an hour. If making a single batch place in oven for 15-20 minutes, or until browned. Serve hot.
Ready for future eating!
Delicious!

“Preserving food is an excellent bank account.”

A Self-Sheltering Pantry

Wanted to reblog this post as we enter another phase of self-sheltering. This was my most read blog this year!

Twisted Basics

As we approach week 10 of self-sheltering, I started to contemplate the future in terms of preparedness. I’m hardly a conspiracy theorist, nor am I a doom and gloom kind of person. I am however a planner. My father used to instruct, “Fail to plan, plan to fail.” After being caught off-guard during the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, I wanted to create a pantry that would sustain us if the predictions of a ‘second wave’ come to fruition this fall and upcoming winter. The idea is to have provisions for a 4 month stay-at-home if necessary.

At the beginning of my recent cookbook Twisted Basics: Laugh, Cook, Eat! I have a section called A Well-Stocked Pantry. It was an attempt to combine a balance between fresh and convenience. When approaching non-growing seasons (late fall and winter) and the desire to leave the confines of our homes as little as…

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Notch It Up!

I’m sure many of you have made something for your families that needed something extra, but you’re not quite sure what it is. Well, I may have the answer for you: Roasted Sweet Pepper and Tomato Sauce. This sauce has it all; it’s sweet, yet piquant, savory and adaptable to so many dishes. The secret is in the roasting. Roasting as we know deepens the flavor of all vegetables and this is no exception. Roasting is so helpful that you can make this sauce even with greenhouse peppers and tomatoes. For me, if I’m going to go through the process, why not make enough to put up? This sauce can be canned in a water bath for 15 minutes, or frozen in half-pint jars. If you roast one sheet pan of peppers, and one sheet pan of tomatoes and garlic it will yield about 5-6 half pints.

But the real deal is just how many uses you will have for it! I’m fond of plating a sauce under an entre like lamb meatballs (next week’s recipe) or cauliflower cake. You can spoon it over a piece of toast or an English muffin and top it with a poached egg. Spoon it over scrambled eggs, or hard boiled eggs or on a sandwich instead of mayo. You are only limited by your imagination!

Sweet peppers ready to be roasted
Halved tomatoes and garlic ready for roasting.

ROASTED SWEET PEPPER AND TOMATO SAUCE

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 sweet peppers, your choice of color, but include one red, halved vertically and seeded
  • 2 tomatoes, cored and cut in half horizontally
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 head of garlic, tops trimmed just enough to expose cloves
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon pure maple syrup
Roasted peppers
Roasted tomatoes

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. Line a large sheet pan with aluminum foil (if you are preparing a batch of quantity, line two baking sheets; using one for peppers and one for tomatoes). Place peppers, tomatoes and garlic on sheet pan.
  3. Baste vegetables with olive oil, then add your salt and pepper. Place in oven and set your timer for 20 minutes. Rotate trays from top to bottom and roast an additional 20 minutes. Remove the tomatoes and roast the peppers for approximately 20 minutes more. You want the peppers charred in various places. If doing a single batch place everything on one sheet pan and roast for 35 minutes.
  4. Let cool slightly, then with a paring knife, carefully pull off the skins of tomatoes, then repeat with the peppers. Discard skins. Squeeze the garlic out of its papery skins.
  5. In a blender or food processor, place your tomatoes, peppers, garlic, red wine vinegar, maple syrup and some additional salt and pepper. Blend or pulse for about 1 minute. Add an additional 3 tablespoons of olive oil and process again until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning adding more vinegar, salt and pepper if needed.
  6. Pour into half pint jars and can or freeze.

Yield: 1 half pint

Roasted red pepper and tomato sauce just blended.

“An ounce of sauce covers a multitude of sins.” —Anthony Bourdain

Hunkering Down

Most of the leaves are off the trees, and the view from my window is brown and gray. We are preparing to self-quarantine for the winter. Our larder and freezers are full of food prepared during our growing season. For all practical purposes we are ready to be home. The wood is stacked and the farm put away for the season.

Winter is actually a much needed quiet time on the farm, regardless of the pandemic. Val and I have stacks of books at the ready. The days are centered around food, discussion, reading, writing and cribbage. It is a simple life that suits us. There are times when the only sounds are the ticking of clocks, the wind across the lake and the crackling of the wood stove. This quiet is the counterbalance to the pandemic and the political tension all around us. With open hands, rather than fists, we will heal our tattered hearts and listen.

The following recipe makes more Indian butter sauce than you will need for one head of cauliflower, but it freezes beautifully and can be at the ready the next time you want to make it. If you want a little more bulk, steam some jasmine rice and serve it along side. It soaks up that wonderful sauce; and you might not have leftovers. You also will want all your spices measured out before you make the sauce, so you can sprinkle them in all at once. Don’t be intimidated by the list of ingredients, it comes together rather quickly; and you will find it on your regular rotation.

Steamed cauliflower sections with Indian butter sauce ready for roasting.

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH INDIAN BUTTER SAUCE

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 large head of cauliflower, cut in quarters leaving as much of the green leaves as possible
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
  • 2 large or 3 small shallots, minced
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoon garam masala
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger
  • 2 large garlic cloves, grated on Microplane or minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 28 ounce can fire-roasted diced tomatoes and their juices
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest
  • Cooked jasmine rice (if using)
  • Chopped fresh cilantro, for serving
Roasted cauliflower with Indian butter sauce

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. In a large pot over high heat, place a steamer basket, 2 cups water, and your quartered cauliflower. Cover, bring to a boil and steam for 10 minutes. Remove the cauliflower with tongs and gently let it drain on a clean kitchen towel. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. Next, make you butter sauce. In a medium heavy sauce pan over medium high heat, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter, add the shallots and a pinch of salt; cook until golden brown, about 5-8 minutes.
  3. Stir in the garlic, ginger, red pepper flakes, cumin, paprika, garam masala, and lime juice. Sauté for another 2 minutes.
  4. Add the heavy cream, and tomatoes with their juices. Add salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium and simmer for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Take off heat and using a stick blender, blend until smooth. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter, and lime zest.
  5. On a large baking sheet lined with parchment paper, place your drained cauliflower quarters evenly on it. Baste each quarter generously with sauce and roast for about 25 minutes.
  6. Place cauliflower on attractive platter and sprinkle with chopped fresh cilantro.

Serves 4

Beautiful roasted cauliflower, with Indian Butter Sauce
Enjoy!!

“Loneliness is the poverty of self; solitude is the richness of self” —May Sarton

Sweet and Sour

There’s a reason fall is called a transitional season. The wind is howling here today with 50 mph gusts, sending our bird feeders crashing against our deck. It’s in the 30’s with periods of snow, mixing in with the falling leaves, sending everything on a Twister ride. No worries, the forecast for next Sunday is 70 degrees!

We are fortunate that our larder is full. Comfort food means different things to each of us. I love it when we turn the corner from summer vegetables to fall. I enjoy pairing vegetables with whole roasted chickens or roasting them for sheet-pan dinners. I’m a visual person, after all, we eat with our eyes, and I love to have bright colors and contrasts in food. This dish is perfect when red cabbage and apples are at Market. It combines the best of color and contrast; as it’s both sweet and sour. It comes together in under an hour and pairs well with chicken, pork or duck.

Sautéing the onions and cabbage

SWEET AND SOUR RED CABBAGE

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 medium red cabbage, cored and thinly sliced (about 6-8 cups)
  • 3/4 cups apple cider or fresh apple juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons fresh dill, chopped, plus more to garnish
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seed
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins
  • 3-4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon local honey

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. In a large pot sauté the onions in butter until lightly browned. Add the cabbage and sauté for an additional 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. The cabbage will reduce in volume quite a bit.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients except the honey. Cover, cook on low heat for about 25-30 minutes.
  3. Add honey and adjust with more vinegar or honey if needed.

Serves 4

Colorful and delicious!

“Vegetables to me are….I don’t want to say the most exciting part of cooking, but certainly a very exciting part of cooking, because they continue to change. They come into season and they go through different phases.”

–Thomas Keller