Tag Archives: garbanzos

When Simple Meets Delicious

There are times after a busy day on the farm that I want to make something healthy yet packed with flavor. If I can get it to the table in 30 minutes, all the better. It also doesn’t hurt that it’s made with my favorite legume, the chickpea or garbanzo. Chickpeas go way beyond hummus, and are excellent in stews, soups, sides and salads, along with grains and pasta. They boast 11 grams of protein in 1 cup, and deliver the most nutrients of all other beans. Loaded with zinc and fiber, they pair well with cuisines from many cultures.

This is a simple stew from Catalonia, Spain loaded with garlic, vegetable broth, spinach, saffron and get this, raisins. In the end, this savory-sweet stew hits on all cylinders. We love it, and I think you will too!

CATALAN SPINACH AND CHICKPEA STEW

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup toasted almonds, ground in a mortar and pestle or food processor
  • 2 large shallots, thinly sliced
  • 6 large cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup tomato sauce
  • 10 ounces fresh baby spinach
  • 2 15 ounce cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins
  • 2 cups vegetable stock (homemade if possible)
  • Large pinch of saffron threads
  • 3 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. In a stock pot over medium-high heat, add 3 tablespoons of olive oil, the sliced shallots and the garlic. Saute, stirring constantly, until shallots are translucent about 2 minutes. Add tomato sauce and simmer for another 2-3 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, in the mortar and pestle or food processor, add the saffron threads, parsley, and sea salt. Process until fine. Set aside.
  3. Add the fresh spinach, and stir until wilted, then add the chickpeas, raisins, and sea salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 cups of vegetable stock and the almond mixture. Simmer for about 5 minutes. Serve in shallow bowls.

Serves 4

“Beans, beans, the magical legume. The more you eat, the more you consume.” –A. Yankovic

Chorizo Chickpea Stew

It’s the time of the year when the grayness of winter has sunk into our bones. I look out at the marsh and lake hoping that the ice will break up and the lake will move again. It’s the annual pause before spring when we are wanting, needing to see life again. I find myself watching for the finches to change color and the crocus to bloom.

To counter this time of the blahs I lean towards cooking something at little spicy, and chorizo definitely does the trick. I enjoy all chorizo whether it’s fresh Mexican (in link or bulk) or cured Spanish (in link ready to eat). Good chorizo is about the flavor profile. Traditionally made from pork, it may contain garlic powder, chili powder, smoked paprika, sweet paprika, salt, ground oregano, ground cumin and black pepper.

Several weeks ago I discovered a chicken chorizo that simply amazed me! The seasoning was perfect, and the texture bellied that it was even chicken. I also found that it was very versatile. I fry up a pound and keep it available for tacos, taco salads, or breakfast quesadillas. Then I made this chickpea stew. Wow.

CHORIZO CHICKPEA STEW

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 pound bulk chorizo of your choice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium white onion, chopped
  • 2-15 oz cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 teaspoon sweet paprika
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 4 cups vegetable stock (preferably homemade)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 cups packed fresh kale, stemmed and chopped

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. In a large heavy pot, brown the chorizo in the olive oil over medium-high heat until no longer pink, breaking it up with the back of a wooden spoon.
  2. Add the chopped onion and continue to cook, until the onion is soft. Add the tomato paste, stirring until incorporated.
  3. Add chickpeas, paprika, salt, and vegetable stock. Cover and simmer on medium-low for 20 minutes.
  4. Add chopped kale, and simmer until kale is wilted and softened, about 5 minutes.
  5. Ladle into bowls.

Serves 4

“In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.” –Margaret Atwood