Tag Archives: dill

Peas, Peas Me

Now that we have moved from spring to summer the fresh food possibilities have exploded.  Strawberries, sugar snap peas, fresh shelling peas, leeks, herbs, beets, garlic scapes and greens, show us how wonderful fresh food can be. Local farmers markets are teaming with everything, and it will only get better. Although we are still challenged with world events and the Covid-19 pandemic, seasonal produce helps to alleviate feeling glum, (at least it helps me to live in the moment).

I’m one of those people whose addiction to crunch surfaces in many ways; this salad for instance. It’s the best in early summer when fresh sugar snap peas, shelling peas and herbs are plentiful. I blanch ever so slightly the fresh snap peas and shelling peas to bring out the vibrancy of their color. This salad works well for a picnic, pot luck or in your screened in porch.

SUGAR SNAP PEA SALAD WITH CIDER VINAIGRETTE

INGREDIENTS  FOR SALAD:

  • 2 pints sugar snap peas, stemmed
  • 1 cup shelled or frozen peas
  • 1/2 small red onion thinly sliced or 2 spring leeks thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons fresh dill, coarsely chopped
  • 8 fresh mint leaves, coarsely chopped
  • Kosher salt, and freshly ground black pepper to taste

FOR VINAIGRETTE:

  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar (I use Braggs)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons filtered water
  • 1/2 teaspoon tamari sauce (I use Braggs Liquid Aminos)
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons pure maple syrup
  • 1 clove garlic, grated
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 3/4 cup cold pressed sunflower oil

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. In a medium pot of salted water, blanch the sugar snap peas for 2 minutes, drain, then place in bowl of ice water. Drain and cut in half on a diagonal. If using fresh peas, blanch for 2 minutes, drain and place in bowl of ice water. Spin both vegetables in a salad spinner, or drain on paper towels.
  2. Slice spring leeks in small rounds, using white and light green parts only.
  3. Chop dill and mint. Place all ingredients in large bowl and toss gently with your hands.
  4. Combine all ingredients for vinaigrette in a pint Mason jar. Shake vigorously. Dress salad with about 1/4 cup dressing (you will have left over dressing) and toss gently.
  5. Serve immediately

Serves 4-6

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“Ahhh 2020 is challenging us; but this too will pass.”

 

 

Earthly Delights

It feels like fall today.  Our weather and climate is unpredictable.  This has been our most unusual farm year.  Vegetables that normally grow without issue have struggled or been unable to grow at all.  This has not been a singular issue.  Many of our customers that have small gardens are wondering why they can’t grow certain vegetable this year.  Although there is no definite answer, as Dylan said, “The times they are a changing.”

Although change is definite, it instructs us to be fully present each day to the small miracles that surround us.  Comfort comes in many forms and simple pleasures can sometimes bring the most well-being.  Today it came in the form of warmth.   Our Katadin potatoes are the old Irish famine potato; earthy, creamy, with thin skins, they are exceptional in taste and texture.  When I first came to the farm I thought that a potato was a potato; until I tasted these remarkable spuds.  If you don’t have access to this particular variety, you can use russets.  It’s important to use a variety that breaks down slightly when cooked.  The advantage is a creamy soup without the use of heavy cream.  Make sure you use fresh dill.  It elevates this soup to something distinctive. Although the ingredients are simple, the soup is heavenly.

POTATO LEEK SOUP

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 pounds of Katadin (or russet) potatoes, scrubbed and cut into chunks
  • 3 medium leeks, using white and pale green parts, scrubbed and sliced thinly
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter (I use Kerrygold)
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt, (I use Maldon)
  • 1/4 cup fresh dill, chopped

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a large pot, over medium-high heat, melt the butter then add the leeks and saute until soft, about 4-6 minutes.  Add the potatoes and salt; then water to cover the potatoes by about an inch.  Bring to a boil, then turn down to medium and cook until the potatoes are soft. (When using fresh potatoes, be aware that these cook much faster than other potatoes that have been cured, or harvested many months earlier).  Taste for salt, add more if needed.
  2. With an immersion blender, blend the soup to thicken, leaving a far amount of chunks.  Add half of the fresh dill.
  3. Ladle into bowls and top with additional dill.

Serves 4-6

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“There is nothing like soup. It is by nature eccentric: no two are ever alike, unless of course you get your soup in a can.” — Laurie Colwin