Tag Archives: leeks

Rotisserie Double-take

I recently posted a recipe for a fool-proof pie crust.  I’m sure all of you put that extra crust in the freezer for another use right?  Well, here you are; a cap for a delicious, rich chicken pot pie.  If not, the recipe is added here.  Remember to freeze half of it for your next adventure.  I remember the pot pies my mother used to buy on sale at the grocery store in their individual tins.  The crust was as dry as dust, and the contents inside made you want to skip it altogether.  This one will not only turn your head, but will end up on a regular rotation in your kitchen.  It’s so good you can even feel confident serving it to guests.  The really good news is that you save yourself extra time by picking up a rotisserie chicken on the way home, and your half way there!

BRICKYARD FARMS CHICKEN POT PIE

INGREDIENTS FOR MAMA JAN’S PERFECT PIE CRUST:

  • 3 cups flour (I use Bob’s Red Mill Fine Pastry Flour)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves, divided
  • ¾ cup butter. cut in pieces
  • 1/3 cup shortening, cut in pieces
  • ½ cup ice water

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Pulse flour, 2 tablespoons thyme leaves, sugar and salt in a processor.  Add butter and shortening; pulse until crumbly.  Add ice water and pulse until it forms a ball.  Dust silicone baking mat with flour; place ball on mat and cut in half.  Wrap one half in plastic wrap.  If using for this pot pie, you may roll it out immediately; place other half in freezer for future use.
  2. Roll out in a circle a little larger than the dish you are using for your pot pie.  A large souffle dish works well.  Cut a small opening to let steam out (I use a small cookie cutter)  Refrigerate rolled out crust for 15 minutes.  Roll loosely around your rolling pin and place on top of your pot pie when you are ready to use it.

INGREDIENTS FOR FILLING:

  • 4 cups shredded rotisserie chicken
  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 cups red-skinned potatoes, cut in 1/2 inch chunks
  • 4 carrots, peeled and cut into 1/2 inch pieces on the diagonal
  • 1 large leek, white and pale green parts only, sliced thin & washed
  • 6 ounces cremini mushrooms, sliced 1/4 inch
  • Zest from 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon thyme leaves
  • 5 tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1/4 cup flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tablespoon heavy cream

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INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F.  In large, high-sided skillet, melt butter over medium-high heat.  Add potatoes and cook, stirring occasionally for 4-5 minutes, or until the potatoes start to turn golden.
  2. Add leeks, carrots and mushrooms, and cook for an additional 4-5 minutes more.
  3. Add your flour and cook, stirring constantly for 1 minute.  Add your milk and chicken stock and bring to a simmer.  Cook until thick and bubbly, stirring constantly, about 3-4 minutes.
  4. Add reserved chicken pieces, parsley, remaining 1 tablespoon thyme leaves, lemon zest, kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.  Mix thoroughly.
  5. Fill you souffle dish, or ceramic dish with pot pie filling.
  6. Make your egg wash of 1 egg yolk and 1 tablespoon heavy cream.
  7. Roll your crust around a rolling pin and drape over pie.  I then use my rolling pin to trim off extra crust.  You may fold extra crust underneath the border, if you prefer that type of look.  If you have used your cookie cutter, place removed piece next to opening.
  8. Brush crust with egg wash.  Place dish on cookie sheet and bake for 35-40, until crust is golden.  Serve hot.

Serves 6

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“Sometimes a little comfort food can go a long way.”

Earthly Delights

It feels like fall today.  Our weather and climate is unpredictable.  This has been our most unusual farm year.  Vegetables that normally grow without issue have struggled or been unable to grow at all.  This has not been a singular issue.  Many of our customers that have small gardens are wondering why they can’t grow certain vegetable this year.  Although there is no definite answer, as Dylan said, “The times they are a changing.”

Although change is definite, it instructs us to be fully present each day to the small miracles that surround us.  Comfort comes in many forms and simple pleasures can sometimes bring the most well-being.  Today it came in the form of warmth.   Our Katadin potatoes are the old Irish famine potato; earthy, creamy, with thin skins, they are exceptional in taste and texture.  When I first came to the farm I thought that a potato was a potato; until I tasted these remarkable spuds.  If you don’t have access to this particular variety, you can use russets.  It’s important to use a variety that breaks down slightly when cooked.  The advantage is a creamy soup without the use of heavy cream.  Make sure you use fresh dill.  It elevates this soup to something distinctive. Although the ingredients are simple, the soup is heavenly.

POTATO LEEK SOUP

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 pounds of Katadin (or russet) potatoes, scrubbed and cut into chunks
  • 3 medium leeks, using white and pale green parts, scrubbed and sliced thinly
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter (I use Kerrygold)
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt, (I use Maldon)
  • 1/4 cup fresh dill, chopped

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a large pot, over medium-high heat, melt the butter then add the leeks and saute until soft, about 4-6 minutes.  Add the potatoes and salt; then water to cover the potatoes by about an inch.  Bring to a boil, then turn down to medium and cook until the potatoes are soft. (When using fresh potatoes, be aware that these cook much faster than other potatoes that have been cured, or harvested many months earlier).  Taste for salt, add more if needed.
  2. With an immersion blender, blend the soup to thicken, leaving a far amount of chunks.  Add half of the fresh dill.
  3. Ladle into bowls and top with additional dill.

Serves 4-6

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“There is nothing like soup. It is by nature eccentric: no two are ever alike, unless of course you get your soup in a can.” — Laurie Colwin

Cream Of The Crop

Spring seems to be dragging its feet around here.  One day it’s warm, the next day it’s cool, while the night’s plunge into the low 40’s and occasionally the 30’s.  It looks like our tomato planting is put off another week. Those 2600 little darlings will just have to wait it out in the hoop house until the night temperatures warm up.

The good news is that the rain and warm daytime temperatures are wonderful for glorious spring asparagus!  Do I see a pattern here?  Wasn’t I just making a pronouncement last week that it’s one of the few vegetables I will only use fresh?  Well, that was last week.  We bought 10 pounds to put up, taking full advantage of fresh Michigan asparagus while it’s plentiful now; and boy is it ever!  Nearly every stall at the farmer’s market is overflowing with the stuff.  I know that we will be reminded of our favorite veggie in this wonderful cream soup long after the season is over.

There are many approaches to asparagus soup, but typically the essentials involve asparagus, onions or leeks and chicken stock.  With spring leeks available, that choice was a no-brainer.  However the addition of garlic, fresh spring tarragon and vermouth kick it up a notch.  And of course there’s the cream.  Honestly, it’s decadence is worth the calories!

Cream of Asparagus Soup:

  • 2 lbs. fresh asparagus
  • 4 Tbsp. unsalted butter
  • 4 small leeks, using white and light green parts only, thinly sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 cup dry vermouth
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh tarragon, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream

Directions:

Snap off the tough stem ends from the asparagus spears.  Cut the tips off a dozen or so and set aside for garnish. Chop the remaining asparagus into 1 inch pieces.

In a small saucepan, blanch the asparagus tips for 2 minutes, then plunge into ice water.  Let drain on paper towels.  Reserve for later.

In a heavy soup pot over medium heat, melt the butter.  Add the leeks and garlic and saute until tender and translucent, about 3-4 minutes.

Fragrant leeks and garlic

Fragrant leeks and garlic

Getting better all the time

Getting better all the time

Add the asparagus and 4 cups of chicken stock.  Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Bring to a simmer, then reduce the heat to medium-low.  Add the chopped tarragon.  Cover and cook for about 20 minutes.

Using an immersion blender, puree the soup until smooth, about 2 minutes. Alternately, you can puree the soup in batches in a blender, then return to the pot.  Add lemon juice and heavy cream.  Reheat the soup to serving temperature.  Ladle in shallow bowls and garnish with reserved asparagus tips.

Tip:  This soup is also great cold, so pack it for your next lunch if you’re luck enough to have leftovers.

Serves: 4

Spring never tasted so decadent.

Spring never tasted so decadent.

“Worries go down better with soup.”