Tag Archives: spread

Confit D’ Oignon, C’est Bon

What’s Confit D’ Oignon?  Why it’s French Onion Marmalade.  Most marmalade’s  or jams are sweet and made from various fruits.  This marmalade has a savory, sweet and tart quality making it an excellent condiment for many things.  I love putting up assorted foods ahead of time.  There’s something special about pulling something from your pantry that you have canned yourself.  Onion marmalade is very easy to make and believe me adds something unique to you repertoire.  This makes an incredible holiday or hostess gift; not to mention surprising your friends and family with the unexpected.

I enjoy making onion marmalade with red onions, but you can also make it with yellow or white; just make sure to change out the red wine and red wine vinegar for white vermouth and white wine vinegar.  This can be canned or frozen depending on your preference.  I prefer to can it so I can give it as a gift that I don’t have to worry about thawing.

I strongly recommend that if you tackle this recipe, consider double or tripling it.  The time is mostly spent reducing and cooking it down to syrupy deliciousness.  It’s wonderful on beef or duck as a condiment.  My favorite way is a slice of toasted or grilled baguette, topped with fresh chevre and then onion marmalade.  Or try sauteed greens, feta, poached egg and top with a bit of the onion marmalade.  Then there’s topping a circle of brie with onion marmalade, wrapping it in puff pastry, then bake.  C’est bon!

IMG_3980(Edited)

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 large red onions (or 6 medium), peeled, cut in half lengthwise, and thinly sliced
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 fresh rosemary sprigs
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup dry red wine (I use Cabernet)
  • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

IMG_3981(Edited)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat, add your olive oil and sliced onions.  Toss them around to make sure they all have a coating of the oil.  Reduce heat to medium and cook, covered until they start to color; about 10-15 minutes.
  2. Add the salt, pepper, bay leaves and rosemary.  Cook, stirring occasionally, for 20-30 minutes, or until the herbs have become soft and wilted.
  3. Add the brown sugar, wine and wine vinegar.  Bring to a boil, stirring constantly; then lower the heat to low and let simmer for 30-40 minutes (if you are doubling or tripling the recipe, this will take longer. In fact the more you make, the longer it will take to cook down; as long as a couple hours.)  Remember patience is a virtue.  Continue simmering on low until the liquid is dissolved and the onions are soft and sticky.  Note:  Stir frequently during this process so that the onions do not stick to the bottom of the pan from the sugar and become burnt.
  4. Remove the rosemary sprigs and bay leaves; discard.
  5. Let marmalade cool before serving or it you are refrigerating it for use within a week.  Otherwise, keep it hot for your water bath canning.  Can in sterilized 4 ounce or 1/2 pint mason jars, leaving 1/8 inch clearance.  Can for 15 minutes.

Yield: 4-5 4 ounce jars

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“Age and glasses of wine should never be counted.”  —unknown

Romancing The Garlic

Hard-neck garlic drying

Hard-neck garlic drying

July is garlic time here at our farm,. We’re busy harvesting, cleaning, hanging and selling heady, beautiful hard-neck garlic. It’s an intense time for a small farm such as ours.  Each step of the process is by hand so although time consuming, it’s definitely a labor of love.  There’s nothing quite like fresh garlic and many of our customers buy large quantities. When stored properly garlic can last well into the following year, while adding that welcome punch to so many recipes.  One way to preserve garlic is to make a “confit”.  The French verb confit means “to preserve.” The term confit in our country has come to mean to poach something in fat at a low temperature for a long time.

Peeled garlic ready to poach

Peeled garlic ready to poach

During the growing season I am always looking for ways to preserve and extend each crop.  Many times while harvesting garlic we have ‘dingers’; heads that we accidentally sink a shovel into or rip the roots off by pulling a little too hard.  We collect these and rather than resign them to the compost pile, we turn them into a delicious garlic confit. These make wonderful hostess or Christmas gifts and can be used in a variety of ways. Try them as a dipping oil for crusty artisan bread, add them to bean soups, to pasta, mashed potatoes or even roasted red peppers for a great bruchetta.  The possibilities are endless, limited only by your imagination.  Who wouldn’t love a jar of this liquid gold?

Garlic Confit:

  • 4 cups whole garlic cloves, separated and peeled
  • Small handful of fresh woody herbs (approximately 8-10) such as thyme or rosemary
  • 1 bay leaf, 8 peppercorns, or 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (try different combinations, as these are entirely optional)
  • 3 cups extra virgin olive oil

Place garlic, herbs, oil and any additional ingredients you have chosen in a medium heavy saucepan.  Cover a cook over very low heat for about 30 minutes.  Don’t allow the oil to rise above 200 degrees F.  You may see small bubbles rise to the top.  To check for doneness, take a paring knife and test a clove.  It should be very soft; if not, poach for an additional 10 more minutes.

Remove pan from heat, keep covered and allow to cool to room temperature.  Using a clean spoon, divide garlic, herbs and oil among resealable jars. (I use 1/2 pint jelly jars)  Can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 4 months.

Garlic ready to slowly poach

Garlic ready to slowly poach

Liquid Gold

Liquid Gold

“The combination of olive oil, garlic and lemon juice can lift the spirits in winter.”

—Yotam Ottolenghi